Institutionalise UX Methodology: Phase F – Long-term

The long-term phase focuses on the management and long-term considerations to keep UX institutionalised.

Institutionalise UX methodology: Phase F - Long-term Institutionalise UX methodology: Phase F – Long-term

The steps for Phase F include:

  • F1. Maintain the management relationship:
    • Keep UX vibrant, effective and respected.
    • What to do:
      • Maintain respect and momentum:
        • The UX team needs to maintain enough respect in order for users’ needs to be fulfilled without being marginalised, ignored or overrun with technology taking precedence over usability.
        • Understand technical language and feasibility.
        • Be able to demonstrate research-based recommendations.
        • It takes time to propagate UX into an organisation. However, it is critical to keep momentum at a rate that is motivating for the UX staff and development team.
        • If there are too few practitioners, too many projects must not be undertaken. Keep the effort focused on smaller projects that can become showcase projects.
      • Take responsibility for usability throughout the organisation.
      • Report progress and achievements to executives.
      • Evangelise:
        • Conduct training and workshops. Organisational change is most effective when other people are empowered to implement it.
        • Mentor junior UX and other staff.
        • Maintain a usability intranet with past reports, highlights videos, guidance for best practice, a slide show and advocacy material that supporters can easily customise.
        • Newsletters (teach people that UX means more than just testing).
        • Speak at industry meetings and UX conferences. This will validate the importance and relevance of UX work in the eyes of one’s peers.
        • Increase the UX team’s profile with professionally-produced posters and giveaways such as mugs and t-shirts.
        • Howto.gov runs a “First Fridays” campaign in order to improve UX and to raise the profile of UX. The goal of “First Fridays” is to teach staff how to find and fix usability problems on websites and applications. This is done by conducting a small usability test with three users. After the test, the observers debrief over lunch and identify the three most serious problems and quick-fix solutions to be completed within 30 days.
  • F2. Maintain UX awareness:
    • Creating and maintaining UX awareness should be an on-going practice.
    • What to do:
      • See the Evangelise step above.
  • F3. Collect metrics:
    • Measure usability to show that the investment is working and highlight areas for improvement. These metrics also assist to measure if business requirements are being met. Metrics should be customised for the type of website and type of business that is being conducted on the website. Website and usability analytics and metrics should be collected as well, in order to explain how well a website is meeting its objectives, in order for improvements to be made.
    • What to do:
      • Collect and measure UX business metrics. The main purpose of these metrics is to validate that UX work is actually being done and to show the growth and stability of UX in the organisation. Track the number of staff hired and trained, the number of people working on usability issues and the number of projects that do or do not apply user-centred-design (UCD).
      • Collect and measure website analytics. The following is a list of popular analytics:
        • Page views
        • Time on site
        • Downloads
        • Click paths
        • Referral websites
        • Conversions
        • New users and returning users
        • Search engines used
        • Keywords used in search engines.
      • Collect and measure usability testing metrics. The following is a list of common metrics used in usability testing:
        • Task completion time
        • Response time
        • Search time
        • Response scores
        • Number and percentage of tasks completed correctly with and without assistance
        • Number and percentage of tasks not completed
        • Number of steps to complete a task
        • Number of times assistance was used in the form of help or documentation
        • Time spent when help was used
        • Number of errors
        • Time needed to recover from errors
        • Comparison testing: which one of the two products do the participants prefer?
      • Collect and measure customer feedback. Customer feedback should be collected from surveys, call centres and e-mail channels.
  • F4. Adhere to laws and regulations:
    • If a government public website is developed, awareness of the laws, regulations, policies and other directives is essential. For example, in the United States, laws exist regarding accessibility requirements.
    • What to do:
      • Adhere to current laws, regulations and policies regarding government websites. Be aware of upcoming laws, regulations and policies.
  • F5. Stay up to date with latest trends and research:
    • Stay current with latest research, trends and best practices.
    • What to do:
      • Conduct training (see Phase B: Setup : training).
      • Attend conferences and industry events.
      • Keep up to date with best practices (see Phase E: Standards : best practices and guidelines).
      • Compile a list of resources. View our list of UX resources.
  • F6. Measure UX maturity level:
    • As shown in Phase A, UX maturity models allow an organisation to measure its current status and to identify the status at which it wishes to be. It is important to conduct on-going measurements of the level of UX maturity in order to measure improvements to the institutionalisation of UX.
    • What to do:
      • Select a maturity model. Exisiting maturity models that can be used include: Schaffer, Nielsen and Feijo.
      • Measure the level of UX maturity in the organisation
      • Use a UX consultant for the most accurate measurement.

View the other Institutionalise UX methodology phases:

Download: Marco-Pretorius-PhD-Thesis (File type: PDF. File size: 7.9 MB)